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U.S. President Donald Trump`s recent statement on plausible mediation in the Kashmir dispute – between India and Pakistan – has again highlighted the 1972 Shimla agreement. The agreement was agreed upon and signed after the 1971 Indo-Pak War, after which East Pakistan was liberated, leading to the formation of Bangladesh. The summit conference between Bhutto and Indra Gandhi opened in Simla on the agreed date. The Simla Agreement Conference was held from June 28 to July 2, 1972. As part of the agreement, the two nations, India and Pakistan, had agreed to refrain from threats and violence in violation of the line of control in Jammu and Kashmir. The Simla Agreement was signed on 3 July 1972 in Shimla, the capital of the Indian state of Himachal Pradesh, between India and Pakistan. [2] This led to the war of liberation of Bangladesh in 1971, which led to the independence of Bangladesh, formerly known as East Pakistan and part of the territory of Pakistan. India entered the war as an ally of Bangladesh, which turned the war into an Indo-Pakistan war in 1971.

[3] The agreement emphasizes respect for the sovereignty, territorial integrity, political independence and unity of the other. It also mentions non-interference in the internal affairs of the other and hostile propaganda. Simla Agreement on Bilateral Relations between India and Pakistan, signed by Prime Minister Indira Gandhi and Pakistani President Z. A. Bhutto, on July 2, 1972 in Simla. The agreement is the result of the two countries` determination to “end the conflict and confrontation that have so far weighed on their relations.” He designed the steps to be taken to further normalize mutual relations and also defined the principles that should govern their future relations. [4] [5] [3] The Delhi Agreement on The Return of War and Civilian Internees is a tripartite agreement between these states, signed on 28 August 1973. The agreement was signed by Kamal Hossain, the Foreign Minister of the Government of Bangladesh, Sardar Swaran Singh, the Indian Minister of Foreign Affairs and Aziz Ahmed, Minister of State for Defence and Foreign Affairs of the Pakistani government. [9] [11] The Simla Agreement, signed on 2 July 1972 by Prime Minister Indira Gandhi and Pakistani President Zulfikar Ali Bhutto, was much more than a peace treaty that sought to reverse the consequences of the 1971 war (i.e. the withdrawal of troops and the exchange of pows).

It was a blue impression for good-neighbourly relations between India and Pakistan. As part of the Simla Agreement, the two countries pledged to end the conflicts and confrontations that have affected relations in the past and to work towards lasting peace, friendship and cooperation. The Simla Agreement contains a number of guiding principles on which India and Pakistan have agreed and which both sides would adhere to in the management of relations between them. They insist on respect for the territorial integrity and sovereignty of the other; non-interference in the internal affairs of the other; respect for unity, political independence; sovereign equality; and hostile propaganda. However, the following principles of the agreement are particularly noteworthy: Mrs Gandhi took place in Simla from 28 June to 2 July 1972. The two countries reached an agreement on 2 July. The agreement contained elements of a previous Indian draft, but the text was significantly amended. In particular, the ceasefire line clause in Kashmir has been reformulated to make it acceptable to Pakistan. The two ministers invoked the 1972 Shimla Agreement and said that bilateral issues could only be resolved with his help — and nothing else. Pakistan ratified the Simla Agreement on 15 July and India on 3 August, after which the agreement came into force on 4 August 1972.